Saturday, February 2, 2008

The Ballot in NY

Merry Jo Bauer sends this useful information on what the primary ballot looks like in NYS. Weird, especially on the Dem side; but nice to know before you go into the booth.
Presidential Primaries in New York State
The Democratic and Republican primaries in New York State are different in important ways, but have similarities. Both are “closed” primaries; participation is limited to the voters who have registered in the party that is sponsoring the election. While delegates are not bound by any law to vote for any particular candidate at the party’s national convention, both parties have “pledged” candidates who vote for the candidate to whom they are “pledged”. Both parties also have “un-pledged” and/or “super” delegates, who are not committed to a particular candidate. A certain number of delegates in each party participate because they occupy a particular elective or party position. Before the primary, candidates submit to the board of elections a list of delegates from each congressional district that are committed to them. These delegates actually appear on the ballot in the Democratic primary, along with a state-wide presidential democratic candidate, but do not appear on the ballot in the Republican primary.

Details of the Nominating Process

Democrats: “Proportional” Primary, 281 delegates at stake

New York Democrats have a total of 281 delegates, 151 of whom are “pledged” and will be elected proportionally based on the results of the February 5th primary within each congressional district. In addition, 45 are automatic and/or chosen from party leaders. The remaining 85 delegates are selected at a state Democratic committee meeting in May.

The Democratic Party in New York always uses a proportional method for awarding delegates. The percentage of delegates each candidate is awarded (or the number of undecided delegates) is representative of the number of primary votes for the candidate.

The Democratic Party primary in New York is really a “dual primary.” Candidates for president appear on the ballot and run against each other in a state-wide primary, and delegates and alternate delegates run in each congressional district. Delegates and alternates are either committed to a presidential candidate or uncommitted, and males and females are equally represented among the delegate choices for a candidate.

Republicans: “Winner-take-all” Primary, 101 delegates at stake
The National Republican Party, unlike the Democratic Party, allows each state to decide whether to use a “winner-take-all method” or the “proportional” method. In the winner-take-all method, the candidate whom the majority of caucus participants or voters support receives all the delegates for the state. New York is a “winner take all” state.

In New York, the selection of delegates and alternate delegates to the Republican National Convention is determined by a statewide primary of candidates for the office of President. Unlike the Democratic primary ballot, the names of the delegates and alternate delegates do no appear. Based on the results of the February 5th presidential primary, 87 of the state’s 101 Republican delegates are allocated to the presidential candidate with the most votes statewide. At a Republican state committee meeting, the remaining 14 unpledged delegates are selected from party leaders.


faithm said...

looking for a picture of the actual ballot which I will see for the first time tomorrow when I go to vote.

KAZ said...

Faith--Since I don't know where you live, I can't help you much. I know what ours looks like in Dryden, NY:
If your Board of Elections is like ours, it has samples on its website for your locality. If your governor is a Republican, your rows A and B will be reversed, for example.